Discussion:
And another one is forgotten...
(too old to reply)
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-12 01:05:37 UTC
Permalink
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501

And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
Bob Henson
2015-03-12 09:06:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.

https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040

Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Year - a period of three hundred and sixty-five disappointments.
Wolf K.
2015-03-12 14:21:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
Ron Hunter
2015-03-12 14:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
Simply, people are texting more, and emailing less.
WaltS48
2015-03-12 14:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
Simply, people are texting more, and emailing less.
Or using Firefox Hello for video chat. I think it even works without a
camera. ;)
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
The Real Bev
2015-03-13 00:26:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
Simply, people are texting more, and emailing less.
I blame Twitter. People don't think, they don't read and they don't
write. They just absorb, react and spew in short bursts.

Not like us :-)
--
Cheers, Bev
------------------------------------------------------
Q: How many lawyers does it take to grease a combine?
A: One, if you feed him in real slow.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-13 07:15:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
Simply, people are texting more, and emailing less.
I blame Twitter. People don't think, they don't read and they don't
write. They just absorb, react and spew in short bursts.
Not like us :-)
I am on Facebook, mainly because so many old (we are all old now)
friends, and relatives are there, but I refuse to have anything to do
with Twitter. I am not a bird, so I don't tweet, and most of my
ramblings are a lot more than 140 characters....
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-13 18:42:37 UTC
Permalink
On 3/12/2015 5:26 PM On a whim, The Real Bev pounded out on the keyboard
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
Simply, people are texting more, and emailing less.
I blame Twitter. People don't think, they don't read and they don't
write. They just absorb, react and spew in short bursts.
Not like us :-)
Yes, like obama did in regards to the two policemen shot. M. Brown
incident got obama on national TV, dems up in arms with LOTS of
attention. The policeman got a tweet from bo ....
Bob Henson
2015-03-12 14:51:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Diplomacy - the art of letting someone else have your own way.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-12 23:40:54 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Every time I think I know where it's at, they move it.
NFN Smith
2015-03-13 00:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
But that's just delivery media.

The general nature of fax is scan -> phone line -> print . The only
thing that's really changed is that instead of having two fax machines
connected by a phone line, it's now common to use email as the transport
mechanism for the scanned image, and where the recipient can choose to
print hard copy, or not. With the latter method, both the sender and
receiver have the option of storage and replication of content.

I regularly tell people that every communication media has distinct
strengths and weaknesses, and that no media is infinitely superior or
inferior to any other media. What is most appropriate for any
particular interaction depends on a number of variables, including who
the participants are, the nature of the communication, and the context.

Thus, although some of the things that email has done in the past may be
being displaced by things such as social media (in the same way that
email and web have partially displaced traditional postal mail), it's
only because the other media work better for those interactions. Despite
the claim from some that "email is dead", it isn't going away any more
than postal mail is going away, as there are specific communications for
which those media are superior.

Although it's unusual, there are still occasions where communication by
smoke signals may be most appropriate.

The only modern media that I can think of that have been rendered close
to obsolete by newer technologies would be fax and pager, and then only
because there's other tools that incorporate the the core functionality,
with expanded capacities.

Smith
Ed Mullen
2015-03-13 02:23:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by NFN Smith
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by
10% from
Post by Wolf K.
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
But that's just delivery media.
The general nature of fax is scan -> phone line -> print . The only
thing that's really changed is that instead of having two fax machines
connected by a phone line, it's now common to use email as the transport
mechanism for the scanned image, and where the recipient can choose to
print hard copy, or not. With the latter method, both the sender and
receiver have the option of storage and replication of content.
Just did that today. Scanned two tax docs into .pdf files, one about 10
Mb, the other about 5.3 Mb. Emailed them to the accountant.
Post by NFN Smith
I regularly tell people that every communication media has distinct
strengths and weaknesses, and that no media is infinitely superior or
inferior to any other media. What is most appropriate for any
particular interaction depends on a number of variables, including who
the participants are, the nature of the communication, and the context.
Thus, although some of the things that email has done in the past may be
being displaced by things such as social media (in the same way that
email and web have partially displaced traditional postal mail), it's
only because the other media work better for those interactions. Despite
the claim from some that "email is dead", it isn't going away any more
than postal mail is going away, as there are specific communications for
which those media are superior.
Although it's unusual, there are still occasions where communication by
smoke signals may be most appropriate.
The only modern media that I can think of that have been rendered close
to obsolete by newer technologies would be fax and pager, and then only
because there's other tools that incorporate the the core functionality,
with expanded capacities.
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
"Yes, I guess, they oughtta name a drink after you." - John Prine
Daniel
2015-03-13 10:43:45 UTC
Permalink
On 13/03/15 13:23, Ed Mullen wrote:

<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Ed Mullen
2015-03-13 15:01:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
Never argue with a fool; he will soon beat you with his experience.
Daniel
2015-03-14 09:54:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
AH!! Your own secret code!! Got-cha!!
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Ed Mullen
2015-03-14 13:19:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
AH!! Your own secret code!! Got-cha!!
911 is emergency the phone number for police, fire, and medical services
in the U.S. It was quite common in the days of pagers here to use 911
in a page to indicate an emergency.
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
Does it bother you that doctors call what they do a practice?
Daniel
2015-03-15 10:08:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
AH!! Your own secret code!! Got-cha!!
911 is emergency the phone number for police, fire, and medical services
in the U.S. It was quite common in the days of pagers here to use 911
in a page to indicate an emergency.
Never having had a pager, I was not aware ....!

Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999

We have a local Pizza joint that goes by the name of "Pizza 911", I
guess if the 'fridge and cupboard are empty, "who ya gunna call??".
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 13:42:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
AH!! Your own secret code!! Got-cha!!
911 is emergency the phone number for police, fire, and medical services
in the U.S. It was quite common in the days of pagers here to use 911
in a page to indicate an emergency.
Never having had a pager, I was not aware ....!
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
We have a local Pizza joint that goes by the name of "Pizza 911", I
guess if the 'fridge and cupboard are empty, "who ya gunna call??".
Well, I am sure that if Ed goes to the UK, he switches to 999. Grin.
How about that Ed?
Ed Mullen
2015-03-15 14:59:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't that
pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number to her pager
in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911), so
what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
AH!! Your own secret code!! Got-cha!!
911 is emergency the phone number for police, fire, and medical services
in the U.S. It was quite common in the days of pagers here to use 911
in a page to indicate an emergency.
Never having had a pager, I was not aware ....!
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
We have a local Pizza joint that goes by the name of "Pizza 911", I
guess if the 'fridge and cupboard are empty, "who ya gunna call??".
Well, I am sure that if Ed goes to the UK, he switches to 999. Grin.
How about that Ed?
If I were there and had an emergency I'd call the front desk. :-)
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
"Making music should not be left to the professionals." - Michelle Shocked
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-15 21:22:17 UTC
Permalink
In message <yZ-dnS06iIl_xJjInZ2dnUU7-d-***@mozilla.org>, Daniel
<***@albury.net.spam.au> writes:
[]
Post by Daniel
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).

(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

What's awful about weird views is not the views. It's the intolerance. If
someone wants to worship the Duke of Edinburgh or a pineapple, fine. But don't
kill me if I don't agree. - Tim Rice, Radio Times 15-21 October 2011.
Daniel
2015-03-16 11:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Daniel
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Here in Australia, TPTB are starting to co-locate Ambulances with Fire
Brigades. If there is a fire, chances are you're going to have need of
an Ambulance as well!!

Traditionally, Ambulances have been dispatched from Hospitals.
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Wolf K.
2015-03-16 14:18:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Daniel
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Here in Australia, TPTB are starting to co-locate Ambulances with Fire
Brigades. If there is a fire, chances are you're going to have need of
an Ambulance as well!!
Traditionally, Ambulances have been dispatched from Hospitals.
We have "emergency medical services" (EMS). In our part of Ontario, the
vehicles park and wait in several locations, in order to reduce the
average response time. The service (based at our hospital) covers about
250km of highway, plus several times that in sideroads. The EMS service
areas overlap, again in order to reduce average response time.

Have a good day,
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 16:21:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Daniel
Am aware that your emergency services number is 911, here it's 000,
U.K., I think, uses 999
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Here in Australia, TPTB are starting to co-locate Ambulances with Fire
Brigades. If there is a fire, chances are you're going to have need of
an Ambulance as well!!
Traditionally, Ambulances have been dispatched from Hospitals.
IN my town, we have a commercial ambulance company, and any time they
get a call, a fire truck comes to, in case they need help with rescue,
so I am pretty sure an ambulance rolls with the FD, but since they don't
share facilities, it's hard to tell without following them, which would
be illegal.
Michael
2015-03-16 20:46:22 UTC
Permalink
Am 15.03.2015 um 22:22 schrieb J. P. Gilliver (John):
...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Germany has
110 - Police
112 - for fires and medical emergencies

https://www.justlanded.com/english/Germany/Germany-Guide/Health/Emergencies
Ron Hunter
2015-03-17 07:56:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael
...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
We do indeed. Though I think (fortunately, I've never had reason to find
out) we also honour the European one (112, I think).
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there were
different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily in that
order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a good idea to me
- saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than one]. They were
listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Germany has
110 - Police
112 - for fires and medical emergencies
https://www.justlanded.com/english/Germany/Germany-Guide/Health/Emergencies
Around here, the FD rolls with ambulance calls because there is
sometimes need for rescue, and additional manpower may be needed for
some calls. If the FD isn't needed after they reach their patient, they
leave. Also, if there is a fire call, police roll with the trucks for
crowd, and traffic control. Also, an ambulance normally rolls also
because they may need to treat fire dept. personnel at the scene, or
quickly remove injured victims, or fire fighters, to medical facilities.
Now if you REALLY want to see a massive response, just get a call from a
school about shots fired. EVERY first responder in the area starts to
the school! It's rather disconcerting to get caught in the middle of that.
PietB
2015-03-17 10:20:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Actually, when I lived in Germany about 40 years ago, ISTR there
were different numbers - possibly 111, 112, 113, not necessarily
in that order - for fire, police, and ambulance. Always seemed a
good idea to me - saves a few seconds [unless you needed more than
one]. They were listed in the 'phone boxes.)
Germany has
110 - Police
112 - for fires and medical emergencies
112 is the sole emergency number in most European countries.
Except in Vatican City, where you have to dial higher powers.

-p

PietB
2015-03-14 10:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by Daniel
Post by Ed Mullen
Hmm. If I text 911 and my phone number to my wife's phone isn't
that pretty much the same as when I sent 911 and my phone number
to her pager in 1998?
Ed, I'm guessing you're not dobbing your wife into the cops (911),
so what does the 911 achieve in this example??
It means "This is an emergency! Call me ASAP!"
Does she know? ;-)

-p
Ron Hunter
2015-03-13 07:13:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by NFN Smith
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by
10% from
Post by Wolf K.
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
But that's just delivery media.
The general nature of fax is scan -> phone line -> print . The only
thing that's really changed is that instead of having two fax machines
connected by a phone line, it's now common to use email as the transport
mechanism for the scanned image, and where the recipient can choose to
print hard copy, or not. With the latter method, both the sender and
receiver have the option of storage and replication of content.
I regularly tell people that every communication media has distinct
strengths and weaknesses, and that no media is infinitely superior or
inferior to any other media. What is most appropriate for any
particular interaction depends on a number of variables, including who
the participants are, the nature of the communication, and the context.
Thus, although some of the things that email has done in the past may be
being displaced by things such as social media (in the same way that
email and web have partially displaced traditional postal mail), it's
only because the other media work better for those interactions. Despite
the claim from some that "email is dead", it isn't going away any more
than postal mail is going away, as there are specific communications for
which those media are superior.
Although it's unusual, there are still occasions where communication by
smoke signals may be most appropriate.
The only modern media that I can think of that have been rendered close
to obsolete by newer technologies would be fax and pager, and then only
because there's other tools that incorporate the the core functionality,
with expanded capacities.
Smith
For a long time, Fax could be used to sign legal papers, provided that
the hard copies of the originals were also shipped immediately, but
email wasn't considered legal. Strange, considering that email has
error correction, and Fax doesn't (or didn't at that time). Now, it
seems that email is legal. The last time I got my trees trimmed, the
guy who gave me the estimate said to just email a photo of the signed
estimate to the office, and they would do the work. It took two tries
to get them to acknowledge the email, but everything got done, and I
just got the receipt for the payment via credit card yesterday. They
aren't fast, but they do great work on the trees.
Daniel
2015-03-13 10:46:57 UTC
Permalink
On 13/03/15 18:13, Ron Hunter wrote:

<Snip>
Post by Ron Hunter
For a long time, Fax could be used to sign legal papers, provided that
the hard copies of the originals were also shipped immediately, but
email wasn't considered legal. Strange, considering that email has
error correction, and Fax doesn't (or didn't at that time). Now, it
seems that email is legal. The last time I got my trees trimmed, the
guy who gave me the estimate said to just email a photo of the signed
estimate to the office, and they would do the work. It took two tries
to get them to acknowledge the email, but everything got done, and I
just got the receipt for the payment via credit card yesterday. They
aren't fast, but they do great work on the trees.
Maybe, they could re-use the fibre from the tree branches to make some
paper for the (nearly non-existent) Fax machine. ;-)
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Caver1
2015-03-13 15:59:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by Ron Hunter
For a long time, Fax could be used to sign legal papers, provided that
the hard copies of the originals were also shipped immediately, but
email wasn't considered legal. Strange, considering that email has
error correction, and Fax doesn't (or didn't at that time). Now, it
seems that email is legal. The last time I got my trees trimmed, the
guy who gave me the estimate said to just email a photo of the signed
estimate to the office, and they would do the work. It took two tries
to get them to acknowledge the email, but everything got done, and I
just got the receipt for the payment via credit card yesterday. They
aren't fast, but they do great work on the trees.
Maybe, they could re-use the fibre from the tree branches to make some
paper for the (nearly non-existent) Fax machine. ;-)
Many businesses still use Fax. My wife's company still uses Fax. She
gets 15 to 20 Faxes a day from various other businesses.
--
Caver1
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-13 18:46:47 UTC
Permalink
On 3/13/2015 12:13 AM On a whim, Ron Hunter pounded out on the keyboard
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by NFN Smith
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by
10% from
Post by Wolf K.
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
But that's just delivery media.
The general nature of fax is scan -> phone line -> print . The only
thing that's really changed is that instead of having two fax machines
connected by a phone line, it's now common to use email as the transport
mechanism for the scanned image, and where the recipient can choose to
print hard copy, or not. With the latter method, both the sender and
receiver have the option of storage and replication of content.
I regularly tell people that every communication media has distinct
strengths and weaknesses, and that no media is infinitely superior or
inferior to any other media. What is most appropriate for any
particular interaction depends on a number of variables, including who
the participants are, the nature of the communication, and the context.
Thus, although some of the things that email has done in the past may be
being displaced by things such as social media (in the same way that
email and web have partially displaced traditional postal mail), it's
only because the other media work better for those interactions. Despite
the claim from some that "email is dead", it isn't going away any more
than postal mail is going away, as there are specific communications for
which those media are superior.
Although it's unusual, there are still occasions where communication by
smoke signals may be most appropriate.
The only modern media that I can think of that have been rendered close
to obsolete by newer technologies would be fax and pager, and then only
because there's other tools that incorporate the the core functionality,
with expanded capacities.
Smith
For a long time, Fax could be used to sign legal papers, provided that
the hard copies of the originals were also shipped immediately, but
email wasn't considered legal. Strange, considering that email has
error correction, and Fax doesn't (or didn't at that time). Now, it
seems that email is legal. The last time I got my trees trimmed, the
guy who gave me the estimate said to just email a photo of the signed
estimate to the office, and they would do the work. It took two tries
to get them to acknowledge the email, but everything got done, and I
just got the receipt for the payment via credit card yesterday. They
aren't fast, but they do great work on the trees.
We're completing a refi, and PDF's are accepted, but they require a
digital signature on the secure server when submitting them. It's way
too easy to alter a PDF, so I don't believe a signed PDF is a legal
document on its own. Of course, I used to be able to alter fax
documents also, since they were transmitted to my computer.
Caver1
2015-03-13 00:46:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Fax ain't dead yet.
--
Caver1
Ed Mullen
2015-03-13 02:19:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
"Yes, I guess, they oughtta name a drink after you." - John Prine
The Real Bev
2015-03-13 05:28:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they do?
Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back? I've done
that, but it seems really crude and unattractive, especially if you have
to take the paper out to your driveway to photograph it and then crop
the asphalt out.
--
Cheers, Bev
"It is never fallacious to properly cite Donald Knuth in
lieu of providing your own argument." --Sun Tzu
Ron Hunter
2015-03-13 07:23:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they do?
Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back? I've done
that, but it seems really crude and unattractive, especially if you have
to take the paper out to your driveway to photograph it and then crop
the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just lay
the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
The Real Bev
2015-03-13 21:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.

OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...

House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"What fresh hell is this?" -- Dorothy Parker
Ron Hunter
2015-03-14 00:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
WaltS48
2015-03-14 00:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
The Real Bev
2015-03-14 01:40:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
A piece of paper with printing or writing on it. It represents money
being transferred from one entity to another. Every once in a while
somebody sends me one, and every once in a while I have to send somebody
one. Archaic, but sometimes essential.
--
Cheers, Bev
==================================================================
"Don't sweat it -- it's not real life. It's only ones and zeroes."
-- spaf (1988?)
Ron Hunter
2015-03-14 07:11:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
A piece of paper with printing or writing on it. It represents money
being transferred from one entity to another. Every once in a while
somebody sends me one, and every once in a while I have to send somebody
one. Archaic, but sometimes essential.
I can, actually, send the electronic equivalent to anyone, but it takes
a ridiculous amount of setup and verification for each payee, as to make
it more trouble than it is worth, but it can be done.
WaltS48
2015-03-14 16:46:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
A piece of paper with printing or writing on it. It represents money
being transferred from one entity to another. Every once in a while
somebody sends me one, and every once in a while I have to send somebody
one. Archaic, but sometimes essential.
I can, actually, send the electronic equivalent to anyone, but it takes
a ridiculous amount of setup and verification for each payee, as to make
it more trouble than it is worth, but it can be done.
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
Caver1
2015-03-14 17:19:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
A piece of paper with printing or writing on it. It represents money
being transferred from one entity to another. Every once in a while
somebody sends me one, and every once in a while I have to send somebody
one. Archaic, but sometimes essential.
I can, actually, send the electronic equivalent to anyone, but it takes
a ridiculous amount of setup and verification for each payee, as to make
it more trouble than it is worth, but it can be done.
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
I don't write anything my wife does. ;)
--
Caver1
Daniel
2015-03-15 10:14:22 UTC
Permalink
On 15/03/15 03:46, WaltS48 wrote:

<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
WaltS48
2015-03-15 13:13:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.

If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."

The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.

I just support the volunteer fire department,

Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.

Last year I was trying to save $60.
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 13:53:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
WaltS48
2015-03-15 14:05:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
My insurance has a co-pay for the emergency room at the hospital of $65.
As I found out the ambulance service was expensive.
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
WaltS48
2015-03-15 14:24:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
--
Kubuntu 14.10 | KDE 4.14.1 | Thunderbird 38.0a2(Earlybird)
[Coexist - Understanding Across Divides](https://www.coexist.org/)
Proofreader wanted - apply online. ;)
The Real Bev
2015-03-15 19:44:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.

The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.

His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"We returned the General to El Salvador, or maybe Guatemala,
it's difficult to tell from 10,000 feet." -- Anon.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 20:36:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.
The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.
His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
Bob Henson
2015-03-16 09:34:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.
The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.
His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

I take long walks in the morning - before my brain works out what I'm doing!
Wolf K.
2015-03-16 14:11:18 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.

My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.

Have a good day.
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
Bob Henson
2015-03-16 14:19:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.
My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.
Have a good day.
Ours would be covered free by the NHS - I was talking of the cost if we
paid for private treatment to bypass the incredibly slow and unreliable
NHS system.
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Atheism is a non-prophet organization.
Wolf K.
2015-03-16 14:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.
My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.
Have a good day.
Ours would be covered free by the NHS - I was talking of the cost if we
paid for private treatment to bypass the incredibly slow and unreliable
NHS system.
NHS isn't free, it's paid for by taxes. If you don't want to spend the
money for the service in taxes, you have to spend it on "insurance".
Keep in mind that from the insurance company's POV you are a cost-centre.

Have a good day,
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
Bob Henson
2015-03-16 14:38:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.
My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.
Have a good day.
Ours would be covered free by the NHS - I was talking of the cost if we
paid for private treatment to bypass the incredibly slow and unreliable
NHS system.
NHS isn't free, it's paid for by taxes. If you don't want to spend the
money for the service in taxes, you have to spend it on "insurance".
Keep in mind that from the insurance company's POV you are a cost-centre.
Have a good day,
True - we get to pay twice for good quick service, once for second
class. Unfortunately, we can't opt out of the NHS whether we would like
to or not. That's socialism for you.
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

There are two theories about arguing with women. Neither one works!
Wolf K.
2015-03-16 15:07:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.
My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.
Have a good day.
Ours would be covered free by the NHS - I was talking of the cost if we
paid for private treatment to bypass the incredibly slow and unreliable
NHS system.
NHS isn't free, it's paid for by taxes. If you don't want to spend the
money for the service in taxes, you have to spend it on "insurance".
Keep in mind that from the insurance company's POV you are a cost-centre.
Have a good day,
True - we get to pay twice for good quick service, once for second
class. Unfortunately, we can't opt out of the NHS whether we would like
to or not. That's socialism for you.
Bottom line: % of GDP spent on healthcare in UK is still only about half
of what the US spends. And you get better overall results. Count
yourself lucky.
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 16:28:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
[...]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
In Canada, that's paid via taxes, as is the surgery. Ambulance ("EMS"
here, includes airlift services) is paid by direct billing, insurance,
or medicare, or some combination thereof.
My wife's hip replacement cost us nothing out of pocket, we even got a
travel grant for post-op consultation with the surgeon, who was located
110 km west of us. Some additional physiotherapy was paid by insurance.
Have a good day.
Ours would be covered free by the NHS - I was talking of the cost if we
paid for private treatment to bypass the incredibly slow and unreliable
NHS system.
Grin. And the UK system is supposed to be an example the US should
follow. Right!
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 16:20:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.
The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.
His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
What about that much vaunted 'free medical' the UK is supposed to do so
much better than the US???
Bob Henson
2015-03-16 18:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.
The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.
His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
What about that much vaunted 'free medical' the UK is supposed to do so
much better than the US???
Not the bits I've seen, they aren't. Wolf K quoted the same thing above,
but from personal experience I can tell you that whilst it works, it is
a very second class service to private medicine here. The NHS ER
departments have been missing every target for months now. Having has a
heart attack in the middle of the night, I was treated and then left
propped up on a trolley for seven hours waiting for a vacant bed with
the very occasional inspection by passing staff. Several hospitals have
been taken into "emergency care" themselves, until standards can be
raised to avoid unnecessary deaths.

I've had two major operations and one minor in private hospitals and my
other half has had one. Whilst visiting her at the weekend, I booked in
for meals there with her, the food was so good. Since the insurance got
too expensive I've had to have another in an NHS hospital, and although
the surgeon was fine (same one as in the private hospital) the hospital
was filthy, noisy and unpleasant and the food barely eatable, never mind
healthy. The cardiac ward in the same hospital was clean and pleasant,
but the nursing and medical care was lax and understaffed. I waiting
eleven days in there to have a cardiac stent fitted that should have
been done within hours, not days, for optimum safety. Waiting lists
are interminably long. In general practice, it takes days (sometimes
weeks) to get to see your own particular doctor (despite the fact I
worked with/for ours here for 15 years and started up the surgery
pharmacy from scratch). I worked in/alongside the NHS for 50 years, and
whilst it was never good, it has never been so bad.

Credit where it is due, they NHS management is one of the most
efficient, self-perpetuating bureaucracies you're ever seen, and the
personal empire building amongst senior staff (at public expense, of
course) is quite unsurpassed. They don't do anything useful, of course,
but that's not their aim - just get more staff and a bigger pension.

Rant over - but it could be a lot longer :-)
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Barbecue - Food prepared alfresco on a grill in the belief that
salmonella-infected meat cooked in sweat and dead flies is appetising.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-17 08:16:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Medicare (and presumably REAL insurers) has negotiated prices for
various services, which is the BIG advantage of insurance. We chose a
medicare supplement policy (Blue Shield Plan F PPO) which pays the 20%
that medicare doesn't pay after it's decided what it WILL pay. No
co-pays, no deductibles. Its premium is 4x Medicare's.
The advantage is that we NEVER have to think "Is this really worth the
cost of going to the doctor?" That's why I didn't go to the doc when I
broke my ribs skiing, and hubby is even worse.
His aortic valve billing was over $250K. It's such a pain to deal with
the EOBs that I stopped looking after a while. Not my circus, not my
monkeys. I'll worry about it when somebody sends me a bill that they
actually expect me to pay.
My wife's knee replacement cost us $500. Plus some for the rehab
treatments, and included a 3 week stay in a rehab hospital.
In the UK, it would cost you nearly that much for an initial
consultation with the surgeon, and more than that for a scan and x-rays.
What about that much vaunted 'free medical' the UK is supposed to do so
much better than the US???
Not the bits I've seen, they aren't. Wolf K quoted the same thing above,
but from personal experience I can tell you that whilst it works, it is
a very second class service to private medicine here. The NHS ER
departments have been missing every target for months now. Having has a
heart attack in the middle of the night, I was treated and then left
propped up on a trolley for seven hours waiting for a vacant bed with
the very occasional inspection by passing staff. Several hospitals have
been taken into "emergency care" themselves, until standards can be
raised to avoid unnecessary deaths.
I've had two major operations and one minor in private hospitals and my
other half has had one. Whilst visiting her at the weekend, I booked in
for meals there with her, the food was so good. Since the insurance got
too expensive I've had to have another in an NHS hospital, and although
the surgeon was fine (same one as in the private hospital) the hospital
was filthy, noisy and unpleasant and the food barely eatable, never mind
healthy. The cardiac ward in the same hospital was clean and pleasant,
but the nursing and medical care was lax and understaffed. I waiting
eleven days in there to have a cardiac stent fitted that should have
been done within hours, not days, for optimum safety. Waiting lists
are interminably long. In general practice, it takes days (sometimes
weeks) to get to see your own particular doctor (despite the fact I
worked with/for ours here for 15 years and started up the surgery
pharmacy from scratch). I worked in/alongside the NHS for 50 years, and
whilst it was never good, it has never been so bad.
Credit where it is due, they NHS management is one of the most
efficient, self-perpetuating bureaucracies you're ever seen, and the
personal empire building amongst senior staff (at public expense, of
course) is quite unsurpassed. They don't do anything useful, of course,
but that's not their aim - just get more staff and a bigger pension.
Rant over - but it could be a lot longer :-)
In other works, your NHS hospitals are like US VA hospitals. It's a
national disgrace. WHY does the US need a hospital system specifically
for veterans? WHY not just subsidize the treatment of veterans in the
private, or public hospitals? Seems to me that would be cheaper, but
then there wouldn't be jobs for all those people 'sucking at the
government teat'. Sigh.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 20:23:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
I'm waiting to see how much the surgery I had Friday is going to cost
me. My co-pay is $125 after the deductible is met. I'm nowhere near
meeting that $750.
Depending on your surgery, you may find that it is much more than $750!
Caver1
2015-03-15 22:32:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
--
Caver1
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 00:35:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Caver1
2015-03-16 00:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
--
Caver1
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 07:09:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
There are some areas of Texas where it is so far from a trauma center
that helicopters are the only hope of the seriously injured to get there
within the 'golden hour'. Often it takes longer than that just for help
to reach the remote location, and assess the need. Some years ago, my
sister lived in Beeville, Tx., which is about an hour north of Corpus
Christi, and she went by helicopter to the hospital. They got her heart
going again, but a few minutes later, and she would have died. How much
is that worth? They had good insurance, but I would have hated to see
the bill.
Caver1
2015-03-16 13:56:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
There are some areas of Texas where it is so far from a trauma center
that helicopters are the only hope of the seriously injured to get there
within the 'golden hour'. Often it takes longer than that just for help
to reach the remote location, and assess the need. Some years ago, my
sister lived in Beeville, Tx., which is about an hour north of Corpus
Christi, and she went by helicopter to the hospital. They got her heart
going again, but a few minutes later, and she would have died. How much
is that worth? They had good insurance, but I would have hated to see
the bill.
I know where Beeville is I lived in Kingsville for awhile. Southwest of
Corpus Christi.
--
Caver1
Ron Hunter
2015-03-16 16:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
There are some areas of Texas where it is so far from a trauma center
that helicopters are the only hope of the seriously injured to get there
within the 'golden hour'. Often it takes longer than that just for help
to reach the remote location, and assess the need. Some years ago, my
sister lived in Beeville, Tx., which is about an hour north of Corpus
Christi, and she went by helicopter to the hospital. They got her heart
going again, but a few minutes later, and she would have died. How much
is that worth? They had good insurance, but I would have hated to see
the bill.
I know where Beeville is I lived in Kingsville for awhile. Southwest of
Corpus Christi.
I have been through Kingsville, but it was about 50 years ago, at least.
Think it's changed? Grin.
Caver1
2015-03-16 17:33:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
There are some areas of Texas where it is so far from a trauma center
that helicopters are the only hope of the seriously injured to get there
within the 'golden hour'. Often it takes longer than that just for help
to reach the remote location, and assess the need. Some years ago, my
sister lived in Beeville, Tx., which is about an hour north of Corpus
Christi, and she went by helicopter to the hospital. They got her heart
going again, but a few minutes later, and she would have died. How much
is that worth? They had good insurance, but I would have hated to see
the bill.
I know where Beeville is I lived in Kingsville for awhile. Southwest of
Corpus Christi.
I have been through Kingsville, but it was about 50 years ago, at least.
Think it's changed? Grin.
About the same amount of time for me. :)
--
Caver1
Ron Hunter
2015-03-17 08:06:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by Caver1
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of
your
fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
If I had been a member "No Hassle Billing. NorthWest EMS will directly
bill a member’s health insurance or third party on your behalf. As a
subscribed member, any co-payment will be waived for members with a
health insurance plan."
The emergency room visit cost me a $65 co-pay.
I just support the volunteer fire department,
Neither are compulsory, but you never know when you might need the
service. It costs me $30.00 to be a subscriber to the EMS service and I
usually donate the same amount to the fire department.
Last year I was trying to save $60.
My insurance has a co-pay, and that is all I pay for the emergency room
at the hospital in my plan (HMO). But ambulance service is quite
expensive, and some insurance doesn't pay for it at all.
If such plans are available, they can save people who need ambulance
service often (a neighbor seems to go by ambulance two or three times a
year), a lot of money. For those in rural areas, there are plans for
helicopter ambulance service on the same 'prepaid' arrangements.
You think an ambulance is expensive. It's nothing compared to what a
helicopter
costs.
Right, that's why the annual deals cost about 5 times as much as land
ambulances in the city. But it is a good deal if you use the service
even once, and if you live an hour by car from a trauma hospital, it can
literally be a matter of life or death.
Here in case of emergency the paramedics do the hauling at no cost.
Helicopters a different story. Never used one yet and right off hand
don't know how much insurance covers.
There are some areas of Texas where it is so far from a trauma center
that helicopters are the only hope of the seriously injured to get there
within the 'golden hour'. Often it takes longer than that just for help
to reach the remote location, and assess the need. Some years ago, my
sister lived in Beeville, Tx., which is about an hour north of Corpus
Christi, and she went by helicopter to the hospital. They got her heart
going again, but a few minutes later, and she would have died. How much
is that worth? They had good insurance, but I would have hated to see
the bill.
I know where Beeville is I lived in Kingsville for awhile. Southwest of
Corpus Christi.
I have been through Kingsville, but it was about 50 years ago, at least.
Think it's changed? Grin.
About the same amount of time for me. :)
As I grow older, some things tend to shock me. I was teaching a Texas
History class, and the realization hit me that the modern history of
Texas began about 1832, and I realized that I had been alive for more
than a third of it. Amazing.
Daniel
2015-03-16 11:19:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
Last year I found out the hard way when I had to go to the emergency
room, that not being a member of the NorthWest EMS service cost me $363.
AH!! So you're talking about what we would call Ambulance Service fees.
Costs me $40 per annum, I think, to cover any ambulance fees either
ground based or air based, and, as I live in the country and regularly
travel 300km (200miles) each way to visit family, if I had need of the
Air Ambulance it could cost me heaps without the Ambulance Insurance,
which is actually run by our Ambulance Services!
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 13:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
<Snip>
Post by WaltS48
I only write the monthly rent check, annual volunteer fire department
donation, and annual emergency services membership.
"annual emergency services membership" ..... Do you have to contribute
to the funding of your EMS?? Or you are a volunteer member of your fire
department but have to pay some compulsory annual EMS membership fee??
There are emergency service 'deals', where you pay so much a year, and
any ambulance calls you have that year are paid. Around here, the cost
is only $49, while the cost of a call without it may be as much as $500.
So, if you anticipate a call, it is probably better to pay the advance
fee. There is a similar arrangement for helicopter ambulance services.
Daniel
2015-03-14 10:01:39 UTC
Permalink
On 14/03/15 12:40, The Real Bev wrote:

<Snip>
Post by The Real Bev
A piece of paper with printing or writing on it. It represents money
being transferred from one entity to another.
Can't you just about say the same for actual bank bills?? O.K., so
nowadays with bank bills being more plastic than paper, maybe not!!
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
Wolf K.
2015-03-14 02:13:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
Cheque.
--
Best,
Wolf K.
kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
The Real Bev
2015-03-14 02:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
Cheque.
Oops, sorry. I didn't realize a translation was wanted :-(
--
Cheers, Bev
====================================================================
Paranoid schizophrenics outnumber their enemies at least two to one.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-14 07:11:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Wolf K.
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
Cheque.
Oops, sorry. I didn't realize a translation was wanted :-(
Just a spelling difference, for those who like the French spelling better.
Bob Henson
2015-03-14 11:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Wolf K.
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
Cheque.
Oops, sorry. I didn't realize a translation was wanted :-(
Just a spelling difference, for those who like the French spelling better.
Nope, purely English. It needs an accent to make it French - chèque :-)
--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Bad or missing mouse driver. Sack the cat? (Y/N)
Ron Hunter
2015-03-14 14:11:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Wolf K.
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
Cheque.
Oops, sorry. I didn't realize a translation was wanted :-(
Just a spelling difference, for those who like the French spelling better.
Nope, purely English. It needs an accent to make it French - chèque :-)
A UK adoption of the French spelling for those who don't have
typewriters with accented letters on them.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-14 07:09:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by WaltS48
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ron Hunter
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has
decline by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will
disappear altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they
do? Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back?
I've done that, but it seems really crude and unattractive,
especially if you have to take the paper out to your driveway to
photograph it and then crop the asphalt out.
I have no trouble at all sending a .jpg file from my phone. Just
lay the document on the kitchen counter, frame it carefully, snap,
email/text it. Takes only half a minute.
T-Mobile charges me a quarter to send a photo. No way unless that's the
ONLY way.
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
than taking a picture with my camera, putting the card into the reader,
editing the shot with picasa, and then emailing it as an attachment...
House is too dark, though. OTOH, who said asphalt was illegal? I've
deposited a few checks via phone, but it's hard to get a picture that
the bank will accept. I suppose practice would improve the process...
It may depend on your phone/camera. Mine has absolutely no trouble
getting a good image. I just put the check on the counter, move the
phone until the check fills the rectangle on screen, and the picture is
taken by the software. Flip the check over, repeat, done. The whole
process takes less than a minute, and I am done.
What's a check?
On the off chance that you are serious, it is a piece of paper that
authorizes funds to be transferred from one bank account to the account
of another person. Most of my income is directly deposited in my bank,
but there are other payments that I receive, such as from my sister in
law for her share of our wireless phone bill, and miscellaneous refunds
from overpayments, or returns, which formerly required a trip to the
bank to deposit. Now my home banking app allows me to deposit them via
my smartphone, saving time and travel.
Rinaldi
2015-03-14 03:34:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't send data
over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi on, the message
won't send.
--
"If God lived on Earth, people would knock out all His windows."
-- Yiddish saying
The Real Bev
2015-03-14 04:23:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't send data
over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi on, the message
won't send.
I haven't tried it either. I guess I just ASSUMED that you could do it,
since you could take a picture and attach it to an email to send it...

You certainly need a really strong connection to make wifi calls with
it, though. I couldn't connect from the Nordstrom hotspot across the
street with my BLU phone, but I sort of could with the Nexus 7 from 30
fet away from our router -- I could hear Allen talking on our home phone
just fine, but he couldn't hear me at all beyond blips and blurps.
--
Cheers, Bev
=========================================================
"If you watch TV news, you know less about the world than
if you just drank gin straight from the bottle."
- Garrison Keillor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-14 10:23:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't send data
over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi on, the message
won't send.
I haven't tried it either. I guess I just ASSUMED that you could do
it, since you could take a picture and attach it to an email to send
it...
[]
I'm guessing that Rinaldi was trying some method other than email (or
has an email setup that doesn't allow attachments - or an ISP which
limits access to its email servers except when connected via the home
connection [which may be fixable by changing settings, such as to allow
authentication {username/password}]).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

what - recession? Up north? What we gonna have - more nowt?
(News Quiz 2013-7-26)
PietB
2015-03-14 09:23:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't
send data over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi
on, the message won't send.
What's wrong with [sending via] e-mail over wifi?

-p
Rinaldi
2015-03-14 13:08:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by PietB
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't
send data over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi
on, the message won't send.
What's wrong with [sending via] e-mail over wifi?
-p
Nothing. The question concerned Hangouts.
--
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
The Real Bev
2015-03-15 19:34:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by PietB
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't
send data over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi
on, the message won't send.
What's wrong with [sending via] e-mail over wifi?
Nothing, but if I want to (I haven't yet, but I MIGHT want to) post a
photo to facebook as a response to a specific post I don't think email
would work. Hangouts seems to extend its tentacles over a wide area :-)

I haven't tried to attach a photo to email with my phone or tablet. No
reason to yet.
--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"We returned the General to El Salvador, or maybe Guatemala,
it's difficult to tell from 10,000 feet." -- Anon.
Ron Hunter
2015-03-15 20:34:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by PietB
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't
send data over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi
on, the message won't send.
What's wrong with [sending via] e-mail over wifi?
Nothing, but if I want to (I haven't yet, but I MIGHT want to) post a
photo to facebook as a response to a specific post I don't think email
would work. Hangouts seems to extend its tentacles over a wide area :-)
I haven't tried to attach a photo to email with my phone or tablet. No
reason to yet.
It is very easy to do with most smartphones. I can attach a video,
photo, or audio capture to either a message, or email.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-15 21:24:16 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by The Real Bev
Post by PietB
What's wrong with [sending via] e-mail over wifi?
Nothing, but if I want to (I haven't yet, but I MIGHT want to) post a
photo to facebook as a response to a specific post I don't think email
would work. Hangouts seems to extend its tentacles over a wide area :-)
I haven't tried to attach a photo to email with my phone or tablet. No
reason to yet.
With my 'phone (Doogee 300, on Android 4.2), one of the default options
for pictures I have taken is to email it. I assume that's not at all
unusual.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

What's awful about weird views is not the views. It's the intolerance. If
someone wants to worship the Duke of Edinburgh or a pineapple, fine. But don't
kill me if I don't agree. - Tim Rice, Radio Times 15-21 October 2011.
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-14 16:16:32 UTC
Permalink
On 3/13/2015 8:34 PM On a whim, Rinaldi pounded out on the keyboard
Post by Rinaldi
Post by The Real Bev
OTOH, I haven't tried to do this with hangouts via wifi -- it's
certainly easier
I need some education on how to do that. Here, Hangouts won't send data
over WiFi. If I have mobile data turned off and WiFi on, the message
won't send.
That's strange. It was designed to work over wi-fi.
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-13 18:49:03 UTC
Permalink
On 3/12/2015 10:28 PM On a whim, The Real Bev pounded out on the keyboard
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they do?
Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back? I've done
that, but it seems really crude and unattractive, especially if you have
to take the paper out to your driveway to photograph it and then crop
the asphalt out.
I don't believe a PDF or image is legally binding. When I submitted
files for our refi, it required a digital signature on many pages.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-13 21:14:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
It's just occurred to me a technology that I think really has
disappeared: telex. I can't remember when I last saw even mention of
one. (I think it might be used on h. f. a bit, and by amateur radio
enthusiasts [on a slightly different baud rate], but I haven't seen a
letterhead or business card giving the telex number for quite a while.)

(By telex I mean what was sent by teletype, Creed, etc. terminals -
using ASCII or Baudot code, usually as two-tone audio. I don't know if
the term telex is UK or EU only.)
Post by The Real Bev
If people need to send a signed document to someone what do they do?
Print it out, sign it, take a photo and send the jpg back? I've done
that, but it seems really crude and unattractive, especially if you
have to take the paper out to your driveway to photograph it and then
If it came to that, I'd use a scanner, not a camera.
Post by The Real Bev
crop the asphalt out.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

When I'm good, I'm very good. But when I'm bad - I'm better! (Mae West)
Ed Mullen
2015-03-14 00:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
It's just occurred to me a technology that I think really has
disappeared: telex. I can't remember when I last saw even mention of
one. (I think it might be used on h. f. a bit, and by amateur radio
enthusiasts [on a slightly different baud rate], but I haven't seen a
letterhead or business card giving the telex number for quite a while.)
(By telex I mean what was sent by teletype, Creed, etc. terminals -
using ASCII or Baudot code, usually as two-tone audio. I don't know if
the term telex is UK or EU only.)
Oh, God. Telex! Back in the 80s when I worked for Sony we used to go
back and forth with Japan via Telex. Then came fax. Omigod! The
amount of thermal paper we went through, egad!

My tiny division had email (via Compuserve) years before the corporation
had email at all. And we had it for a few years before the corporation
instituted it company-wide. We were only about 15 people on a small
project but we were using email in, uhh ... 1985 or about then, when I
was a Sony dealer. I went to work for them in 1986, moved to HQ in '88,
the company, I think, instituted email in 1990.
--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net/
UnHallmark Card: I'm so miserable without you - it's almost like you're
here.
PietB
2015-03-14 09:08:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It's just occurred to me a technology that I think really has
disappeared: telex.
(By telex I mean what was sent by teletype, Creed, etc. terminals -
using ASCII or Baudot code, usually as two-tone audio.
Audio? Telex used dc current loop, 20, 50 or 80 mA.

-p
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2015-03-14 10:27:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by PietB
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It's just occurred to me a technology that I think really has
disappeared: telex.
(By telex I mean what was sent by teletype, Creed, etc. terminals -
using ASCII or Baudot code, usually as two-tone audio.
Audio? Telex used dc current loop, 20, 50 or 80 mA.
-p
What, between machines a long distance apart? Or did it have its own
exchange machinery that provided the current at each end?

(The old Creed 7B that was part of my final year project used ±80V
rather than a specified current, but that might have been a
modification. Fascinating thing - did its decoding of the Baudot code
entirely mechanically. And noisy! We used to say you hadn't been
properly initiated until you'd spent some time in a small room with one
with the cover off [I think we'd lost the cover to ours].)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

what - recession? Up north? What we gonna have - more nowt?
(News Quiz 2013-7-26)
PietB
2015-03-14 12:32:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by PietB
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It's just occurred to me a technology that I think really has
disappeared: telex.
(By telex I mean what was sent by teletype, Creed, etc. terminals -
using ASCII or Baudot code, usually as two-tone audio.
Audio? Telex used dc current loop, 20, 50 or 80 mA.
What, between machines a long distance apart?
Or did it have its own exchange machinery that provided the
current at each end?
Sure. Just like long distance telephony in the old days.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(The old Creed 7B that was part of my final year project used
±80V rather than a specified current, but that might have been
a modification.
It wasn't a modification. The machine used double-current
(plus and minus) and the voltage was chosen to provide
adequate current through the electromagnet.
http://www.rtty.com/England/creed1.html

-p
Ron Hunter
2015-03-13 07:20:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Mullen
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
They said that about fax ...
Just sent a 14 page fax yesterday.
The way modern FAX equipment works, it looks more like email. Store and
archive, store and hold, seems more common that direct to print.
Daniel
2015-03-13 10:36:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
Just as news groups won't die, they'll just fade away!! ;-P
--
Daniel

User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:35.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.32 Build identifier: 20141218225909
or
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101
SeaMonkey/2.33 Build identifier: 20150215202114
PietB
2015-03-13 11:41:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by
10% from 2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
Just as news groups won't die, they'll just fade away!! ;-P
Reality rarely fulfils negative predictions/expectations.

-p
F***@pobox.com
2015-03-13 18:43:15 UTC
Permalink
On 3/12/2015 7:51 AM On a whim, Bob Henson pounded out on the keyboard
Post by Bob Henson
Post by Wolf K.
Post by Bob Henson
Post by F***@pobox.com
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=687501
And here I was encouraged to file these bugs to "make Mozilla better".
Can't be better if you don't fix it! ;-)
We've probably all got at least one of those. Mine is nearly as old as
yours and, although acknowledged, is still unadopted.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=799040
Unfortunately, no-one is writing e-mail clients any more, and as
Thunderbird is the best of the rest, that's what we're stuck with.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10% from
2013 to 2014.
That doesn't surprise me. However, I don't think it will disappear
altogether, it is far to useful for businesses.
Unless it's on Hillary's servers... ;-)
»Q«
2015-03-12 21:51:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline by 10%
from 2013 to 2014.
Just a blip -- in 2014, Hillary Clinton had her people go through the
e-mail and delete all the ones that weren't job-related.
PietB
2015-03-13 11:37:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolf K.
Read in yesterday's Toronto Star that e-mail use has decline
by 10% from 2013 to 2014.
That's what you get with a major server or network outage.

-p
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